Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD) via the CCDC103 Gene

Summary and Pricing

Test Method

Exome Sequencing with CNV Detection
Test Code Test Copy GenesTest CPT Code Gene CPT Codes Copy CPT Codes Base Price
9143 CCDC103 81479 81479,81479 $890 Order Options and Pricing
Test Code Test Copy Genes Test CPT Code Gene CPT Codes Copy CPT Code Base Price
9143CCDC10381479 81479(x2) $890 Order Options and Pricing

Pricing Comments

Our favored testing approach is exome based NextGen sequencing with CNV analysis. This will allow cost effective reflexing to PGxome or other exome based tests. However, if full gene Sanger sequencing is desired for STAT turnaround time, insurance, or other reasons, please see link below for Test Code, pricing, and turnaround time information.

An additional 25% charge will be applied to STAT orders. STAT orders are prioritized throughout the testing process.

Click here for costs to reflex to whole PGxome (if original test is on PGxome Sequencing backbone).

Click here for costs to reflex to whole PGnome (if original test is on PGnome Sequencing backbone).

The Sanger Sequencing method for this test is NY State approved.

For Sanger Sequencing click here.

Turnaround Time

18 days on average for standard orders or 13 days on average for STAT orders.

Please note: Once the testing process begins, an Estimated Report Date (ERD) range will be displayed in the portal. This is the most accurate prediction of when your report will be complete and may differ from the average TAT published on our website. About 85% of our tests will be reported within or before the ERD range. We will notify you of significant delays or holds which will impact the ERD. Learn more about turnaround times here.

Targeted Testing

For ordering sequencing of targeted known variants, go to our Targeted Variants page.

EMAIL CONTACTS

Genetic Counselors

Geneticist

  • Fang Xu, PhD, FACMG

Clinical Features and Genetics

Clinical Features

Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disorder affecting the function of motile cilia (Leigh et al. 2009). The hallmark features of PCD are neonatal respiratory distress, chronic coughing, and recurrent sinus and/or ear infections; 80-100% of all PCD patients have one or more of these symptoms. In 20-50% of individuals with PCD, the major visceral organs are reversed from their normal positions (also called situs inversus) (Sutherland and Ware 2009). Kartagener’s syndrome is a condition defined by the symptomatic triad of situs inversus, sinusitis and bronchiectasis. Patients with PCD can also have abnormal orientation of some organs but not others (a condition called situs ambiguus or heterotaxy) (Kennedy et al. 2007). For more information, see GeneReviews (Zariwala et al. 2013).

Genetics

Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia is inherited most commonly in an autosomal recessive manner due to defects in motile cilia. To date, defects in at least 30 genes, including CCDC103, have been reported to cause PCD (Panizzi et al. 2012). Cilia in the respiratory tract, brain and sperm flagella consist of nine peripheral microtubule doublets surrounding two central microtubules; nodal cilia in the embryo lack the central microtubules (Ferkol and Leigh 2006). All motile cilia have both inner and outer dynein arms attached at regular intervals to the peripheral microtubule doublets. The dynein arms consist of heavy, intermediate, and light dynein chains, and serve as molecular motors that drive microtubule sliding. Most frequently, patients with PCD have structural defects in the outer dynein arms (ODA), rendering the cilia immotile and non-functional. CCDC103 encodes for a protein involved in assembly of dynein arms.

Pathogenic variants in CCDC103 have been found in individuals with autosomal recessive PCD with and without laterality defects. Affected individuals had variable defects of the inner and outer dynein arms as well as defects in ciliary beating ranging from loss of beat coordination to complete ciliary paralysis (Panizzi et al. 2012, Zariwala et al. 2013). Heterozygous carriers were not affected (Panizzi et al. 2012; D'Andrea et al. 2013). To date, no gross deletions or duplications within the CCDC103 locus have been described.

Clinical Sensitivity - Sequencing with CNV PGxome

This test is predicted to detect biallelic pathogenic variants in CCDC103 in ~4% of individuals with PCD (Panizzi et al. 2012).

Testing Strategy

This test provides full coverage of all coding exons of the CCDC103 gene plus 10 bases of flanking noncoding DNA in all available transcripts along with other non-coding regions in which pathogenic variants have been identified at PreventionGenetics or reported elsewhere. We define full coverage as >20X NGS reads or Sanger sequencing. PGnome panels typically provide slightly increased coverage over the PGxome equivalent. PGnome sequencing panels have the added benefit of additional analysis and reporting of deep intronic regions (where applicable).

Dependent on the sequencing backbone selected for this testing, discounted reflex testing to any other similar backbone-based test is available (i.e., PGxome panel to whole PGxome; PGnome panel to whole PGnome).

Indications for Test

This test is for patients with PCD, with or without situ abnormalities. This test may also be considered for the reproductive partners of individuals who carry pathogenic variants in CCDC103.

Gene

Official Gene Symbol OMIM ID
CCDC103 614677
Inheritance Abbreviation
Autosomal Dominant AD
Autosomal Recessive AR
X-Linked XL
Mitochondrial MT

Disease

Name Inheritance OMIM ID
Ciliary Dyskinesia, Primary, 17 614679

Citations

  • D’Andrea G, Schiavulli M, Dimatteo C, Santacroce R, Guerra E, Longo VA, Grandone E, Margaglione M. 2013. Homozygosity by descent of a 3Mb chromosome 17 haplotype causes coinheritance of Glanzmann thrombasthenia and primary ciliary dyskinesia. Blood 122: 4289–4291. PubMed ID: 24357714
  • Ferkol and Leigh 2006. PubMed ID: 17142159
  • Kennedy. et al. 2007. PubMed ID: 17515466
  • Leigh M.W. et al. 2009. Genetics in Medicine : Official Journal of the American College of Medical Genetics. 11: 473-87. PubMed ID: 19606528
  • Panizzi JR, Becker-Heck A, Castleman VH, Al-Mutairi DA, Liu Y, Loges NT, Pathak N, Austin-Tse C, Sheridan E, Schmidts M, Olbrich H, Werner C, Häffner K, Hellman N, Chodhari R, Gupta A, Kramer-Zucker A, Olale F, Burdine RD, Schier AF, O'Callaghan C, Chung EM, Reinhardt R, Mitchison HM, King SM, Omran H, Drummond IA. 2012. CCDC103 mutations cause primary ciliary dyskinesia by disrupting assembly of ciliary dynein arms. Nature Genetics 44: 714-719. PubMed ID: 22581229
  • Panizzi JR, Becker-Heck A, Castleman VH, Al-Mutairi DA, Liu Y, Loges NT, Pathak N, Austin-Tse C, Sheridan E, Schmidts M, Olbrich H, Werner C, Häffner K, Hellman N, Chodhari R, Gupta A, Kramer-Zucker A, Olale F, Burdine RD, Schier AF, O'Callaghan C, Chung EM, Reinhardt R, Mitchison HM, King SM, Omran H, Drummond IA. 2012. CCDC103 mutations cause primary ciliary dyskinesia by disrupting assembly of ciliary dynein arms. Nature Genetics 44: 714-719. PubMed ID: 22581229
  • Sutherland and Ware. 2009. PubMed ID: 19876930
  • Zariwala M.A. et al. 2013. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Bird TD, Dolan CR, Fong C-T, and Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews™, Seattle (WA): University of Washington, Seattle. PubMed ID: 20301301
  • Zariwala MA, Gee HY, Kurkowiak M, Al-Mutairi DA, Leigh MW, Hurd TW, Hjeij R, Dell SD, Chaki M, Dougherty GW, Adan M, Spear PC, Esteve-Rudd J, Loges NT, Rosenfeld M, Diaz KA, Olbrich H, Wolf WE, Sheridan E, Batten TF, Halbritter J, Porath JD, Kohl S, Lovric S, Hwang DY, Pittman JE, Burns KA, Ferkol TW, Sagel SD, Olivier KN, Morgan LC, Werner C, Raidt J, Pennekamp P, Sun Z, Zhou W, Airik R, Natarajan S, Allen SJ, Amirav I, Wieczorek D, Landwehr K, Nielsen K, Schwerk N, Sertic J, Köhler G, Washburn J, Levy S, Fan S, Koerner-Rettberg C, Amselem S, Williams DS, Mitchell BJ, Drummond IA, Otto EA, Omran H, Knowles MR, Hildebrandt F. 2013. ZMYND10 Is Mutated in Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia and Interacts with LRRC6. The American Journal of Human Genetics 93: 336–345. PubMed ID: 23891469

Ordering/Specimens

Ordering Options

We offer several options when ordering sequencing tests. For more information on these options, see our Ordering Instructions page. To view available options, click on the Order Options button within the test description.

myPrevent - Online Ordering

  • The test can be added to your online orders in the Summary and Pricing section.
  • Once the test has been added log in to myPrevent to fill out an online requisition form.
  • PGnome sequencing panels can be ordered via the myPrevent portal only at this time.

Requisition Form

  • A completed requisition form must accompany all specimens.
  • Billing information along with specimen and shipping instructions are within the requisition form.
  • All testing must be ordered by a qualified healthcare provider.

For Requisition Forms, visit our Forms page


Specimen Types

Specimen Requirements and Shipping Details

PGxome (Exome) Sequencing Panel

PGnome (Genome) Sequencing Panel

loading Loading... ×

ORDER OPTIONS

View Ordering Instructions

1) Select Test Method (Backbone)


1) Select Test Type


2) Select Additional Test Options

STAT and Prenatal Test Options are not available with Patient Plus.

No Additional Test Options are available for this test.

Note: acceptable specimen types are whole blood and DNA from whole blood only.
Total Price: $
×
Copy Text to Clipboard
×